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A Worthwhile Talk About Tipping Points

As part of Utah Climate Week I attended a talk about climate change that is well worth your time to watch. I had seen another talk of by the same speaker a few weeks ago and liked his take on climate change. He uses his physics background to illustrate the salient points and boils the problem and solution down to something we can all wrap our heads around. If you are worried that the talk will bring back nightmares from your high school physics class, there is no need to worry. I don’t recall seeing a single equation. The recording is below and after the description there is a link to an earlier talk of his that is also worth your time.

Dr. Rob Davies: “Tipping Points”

https://youtu.be/qsZ2XHRFnf8


Utah Climate Week - Rob Davies

Trained as a physicist, Dr. Davies’ work focuses on complexity, global change, human vibrancy, and critical science communication. Rob has delivered hundreds of public lectures ― to policymakers, business leaders, civic organizations and faith communities ― and his “performance science” theatrical collaboration The Crossroads Project | Rising Tide, co-createdj with the Fry Street Quartet, has been performed across the U.S. and in three countries. He has served as a scientific liaison for NASA; as a project scientist with Utah State University’s Space Dynamics Laboratory; and an officer and meteorologist in the United States Air Force. Dr. Davies has served on the faculty of three universities, is a past Associate of the Utah Climate Center, and is currently Associate Professor of Professional Practice with Utah State University, where he holds a joint appointment in the Dep’t of Physics, USU’s Ecology Center, and the Caine College of the Arts.


You can learn more about Dr. Davies’ work via a past lecture at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ufphd21wqwk

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